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Fr. Neil Walters’ Homily, June 15, 2014, 11:30AM Mass

We are pleased to make available the audio file with the Sunday Homily.

The homily was preached by Fr. Neil Walters during the 11:30AM Mass, which was Trinity Sunday (and Father’s Day) at St. Malachi’s.

Fr. Walters serving as the chaplain at the Cuyahoga County Jail and is now in residence at St. Malachi’s (with no Pastoral duties). We welcome Fr. Walters to St. Malachi’s and are happy to share his first Sunday homily with you today.

To listen to the homily, first click here to access the MP3 audio file, then click on the play button. (The play button is shaped like a triangle.)

 

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Anger and the Imperative to Reconcile

In the Gospel for Thursday of the Tenth Week of Ordinary Time, Jesus tells his disciples that their righteousness must surpass that of the Scribes and Pharisees. He then challenges them to go beyond obedience to the commandment “you shall not kill” to address anger and hostility toward another (mt 5:20-26).

Jesus’ comments about anger and hostility seem, at first glance, to be rather extreme: “But I say to you, whoever is angry with his brother will be liable to judgment, and whoever says to his brother, ‘Raqa,’ [“Idiot”] will be answerable to the Sanhedrin [the Jewish court], and whoever says, ‘You fool,’ will be liable to fiery Gehenna [literally, the burning garbage pit outside of Jerusalem; it came to be used as an image of “hell”].

Judgment for anger? Hauled in to court for name-calling? Going to hell for calling someone a fool? Isn’t getting angry normal – just human nature? Doesn’t it happen to everyone? And while we may not approve of nasty language and teach our children not to call people names, isn’t it pretty common?

Yet anger so often begets violence. Consider events on the west side of Cleveland during the last several days:

  • On June 2, a 28 year-old man shot and killed his 26 year-old roommate at his house on W. 73 St. after the man was arguing with the shooter’s sister, whom he was dating. (Cleveland man shoots, kills roommate)
  • On June 7, Tearrance Jackson, 22 years old, was shot and killed in Thrush Park. Reportedly, the people with him saw trouble coming and took off. Tearrance did not recognize the situation and was just standing alone when someone walked up and shot him. (Cleveland man fatally shot at West Side park) [Tearrance is the son of Willie “JoJo” Jackson, who works at St. Malachi Center.]
  • Early on the morning of June 10, Derrice Alexander got into an argument with the mother of his son, Derrice Jr. in their apartment at Lakeview Terrace. Ultimately, he stormed out of the building, then turned around, pulled out his gun and fired a shot back into the apartment through the window, hitting and killing his son, Derrice Jr. (2-year-old fatally shot)
  •  Also early on June 10, two men got into a fight with knives on W. 46 St., leaving one dead and the other seriously wounded and rushed to the hospital. (West Side knife fight)

In these four cases, “common” anger led to arguments which led to violence, which resulted in death.

Jesus understood human nature very well and recognized the connection between anger and killing.  His instruction in the Sermon on the Mount against anger, abusive language and behavior is neither as extreme as it appears or unrealistic in its assessment of where anger leads.  Learning to control and subdue our anger and resist speaking and acting out of anger is the key to ending the cycle of violence that continues to plague our city, our society, and our world.  It is a serious responsibility for each person him/herself and for every parent and every teacher for every child.

The Gospel passage concludes with: “if you bring your gift to the altar, and there recall that your brother has anything against you, leave your gift at the altar, go first and be reconciled with your brother, and then come offer your gift.” Without reconciliation, there can be no peace. Without being reconciled, we cannot offer authentic worship.

The work of controlling anger and working for reconciliation is spiritual work; ultimately, it is the work of God’s grace. In the second Eucharistic Prayer for Reconciliation, we pray:

For though the human race is divided by dissension and discord, yet we know that by testing us you change our hearts to prepare them for reconciliation. Even more, by your Spirit you move human hearts that enemies may speak to each other again, adversaries join hands, and peoples seek to meet together. By the working of your power it comes about, O Lord, that hatred is overcome by love, revenge gives way to forgiveness, and discord is changed to mutual respect.

Let this be our prayer. Let this be our commitment.

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Fr. Jim O’Donnell’s Homily, June 8, 2014, 11:30AM Mass

We are pleased to make available the audio file with the Sunday Homily.

The homily was preached by Fr. Jim O’Donnell during the 11:30AM Mass, which was Pentacost Sunday, at St. Malachi’s. To listen to the homily, first click here to access the MP3 audio file, then click on the play button. (The play button is shaped like a triangle.)

 

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Fr. Tony Schuerger’s Homily, June 1, 2014, 11:30AM Mass

We are pleased to make available the audio file with the Sunday Homily.

The homily was preached by Fr. Anthony Schuerger during the 11:30AM Mass, which was the Feast of the Ascension of the Lord, at St. Malachi’s. To listen to the homily, first click here to access the MP3 audio file, then click on the play button. (The play button is shaped like a triangle.)

 

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Living (Up to) and Practicing What You Believe

You can’t just talk the talk; you’ve got to walk the walk.

Actions speak louder than words.

These well-known and oft-repeated sayings are, rightly, considered clichés. They have become clichés precisely because they speak a truth that most people believe and support: A person is expected to live in a way that is consistent with his/her beliefs and values.

There is another well-known saying:
Do what I say, not what I do.

This, too, has become a cliché. However, there is a fundamental difference between this saying and the first two. People generally do not to support this way of operating, except when absolutely necessary. In fact, most people tend to use another word to describe someone who lives this way–hypocrite.

In Matthew’s Gospel, Jesus comments on this very attitude:

“The scribes and Pharisees have taken their seat on the chair of Moses. Therefore, do and observe all things whatsoever they tell you, but do not follow their example. For they preach but they do not practice.” (Mt. 23: 2-3).

“Preaching but do not practice” is perhaps the worst thing that can be said about any clergy person or church official. This is precisely why not only the Catholic Church, but the entire world, has been shocked and scandalized by clergy sexual abuse of minors and the inadequate response (and, in some places, the attempted cover-up) by bishops. It is why, despite the real reforms and evident commitment to remove perpetrators and protect children, many Catholics and people around the world continue to be skeptical about the reality of the reform and change in church practices.

It is in this context that the Catholic Diocese of Cleveland’s recent action to strengthen the “morality clause” in the contracts for elementary school teaches in Catholic schools should be understood. … continue reading “Living (Up to) and Practicing What You Believe”

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Fr. Tony Schuerger’s Homily, May 25, 2014, 9:00AM Mass

We are pleased to make available the audio file with the Sunday Homily.

The homily was preached by Fr. Anthony during the 11:30AM Mass, which was the Sixth Sunday of Easter at St. Malachi’s. To listen to the homily, first click here to access the MP3 audio file, then click on the play button. (The play button is shaped like a triangle.)

 

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Join us for Samaritan Ministry

Samaritan Ministry: Addiction Awareness Workshop

The Samaritan Ministry of St. Malachi Parish will offer a FREE one-day workshop on ADDICTION AWARENESS in St. Malachi Center (behind the church), West 25th & Detroit, on Saturday, June 14, 2014, from 9 AM to 4 PM.  PB&J sandwiches, snacks and beverages will be provided.  Donations welcome.

Relevant topics will include: addiction/alcoholism as a brain disease; effects of drinking/using on others; treatment options; 12-Step programs of recovery; prevention; resources in the community

For information/to register: Judy Stowe (440/250-9959) judystowe@gmail.com or St. Malachi Rectory (216/861-5343).

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St. Malachi Annual Parish Meeting – April 27, 2014

Thanks to all who participated in the St. Malachi Annual Parish Meeting on April 27, 2014.  Your input is truly appreciated!

Your suggestions and concerns about the Sunday Mornings programming have been given to the appropriate commissions, and will get prayerful attention.

This is a one-year trial, and we will try to take your suggestions to heart and make improvements as we continue throughout the year.

Gratefully,

Your Parish Council

 

Click on the links below to view the notes from the Large and Small Group Discussions that took place at the meeting:

St Malachi Annual Meeting – Summary of Table Discussions 4_27_14

St Malachi Annual Parish Meeting – Large Group Discussion Comments 4_27_14

 

 

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Fr. Jim O’Donnell’s Homily, May 18, 2014, 11:30AM Mass

We are pleased to make available the audio file with the Sunday Homily.

The homily was preached by Fr. Jim O’Donnell during the 11:30AM Mass, which was the Fifth Sunday of Easter at St. Malachi’s. To listen to the homily, first click here to access the MP3 audio file, then click on the play button. (The play button is shaped like a triangle.)

 

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Marathon Sunday, 5/18/2014, Driving Routes to St. Malachi

The Rite-Aid Marathon will be run this Sunday, May 18th and driving to St. Malachi will require some extra time and planning for many of us. The official course maps are located at www.clevelandmarathon.com/Course_Maps/.

It is a bit tricky reviewing these maps since there are 3 separate races.  We have identified some routes that should work.  From Lakewood, I-71 and I-77 the secret is to get onto Train Ave.  Here they are in Google Maps:

From Lakewood, starting at Warren and Madison:  Route from Lakewood

From Southwest suburbs via I-71, starting at I-71 and W. 150th St.:  Route from I-71

From South suburbs via I-77, starting from I-77 and Rockside Rd.:  Route from I-77

From Cleveland Hts, starting near Cedar Hill:  Route from Cleveland Hts

For those who prefer turn-by-turn directions, here they are again:

Route from Lakewood

Start at Warren and Madision.  Go East on Madision to West 65th St.

Go right (south) on West 65th St. to Clark Ave., turn left (east) on Clark Ave.

Take Clark briefly to the U-Haul building, turn left on Train Ave.

Take Train Ave. to Wiley Ave. and turn left.

Take Wiley Ave. to Columbus Rd. and turn right (north).

Take Columbus Ave. to the bottom of the hill and turn left on Franklin Ave.

Go up Franklin hill to West 25th St. and turn right (north).

Take West 25th St. to St. Malachi.

 

Route from I-71

Start at I-71 and W. 150th St., go north on I-71.

Take I-71 to Fulton Rd.  Go left at on Fulton (north).

Take Fulton to Vega Ave. and go left.

Take Vega Ave. to Train Ave. and turn right.

Take Train Ave. to Wiley Ave. and turn left.

Take Wiley Ave. to Columbus Rd. and turn right (north).

Take Columbus Ave. to the bottom of the hill and turn left on Franklin Ave.

Go up Franklin hill to West 25th St. and turn right (north).

Take West 25th St. to St. Malachi.

 

Route from I-77

Start at Rockside Rd. and I-77, go north on I-77.  Exit on I-490 West.

Go west on I-490 to I-90 West.  I-90 West to the West 44th St. Exit.

South on West 44th St. to Clark Avenue.  Left (east) on Clark.

Take Clark to W. 41st St. and turn left (north) on W. 41st St.

Take W. 41st St. to Richner Ave. and turn right.

Take Richner to Train Ave. and turn right (east).

Take Train Ave. to Wiley Ave. and turn left.

Take Wiley Ave. to Columbus Rd. and turn right (north).

Take Columbus to the bottom of the hill and turn left on Franklin Ave.

Go left on Franklin Ave, up the hill, to West 25th St.

Turn right on W. 25th St. to St. Malachi.

 

Route from Cleveland Hts.

Come down Cedar Hill, turn right on MLK Jr. and then proceed along Chester.

Take Chester to the Innerbelt (I-90) and turn onto I-90 East.

Take I-90 East to Route 2 (Shoreway) West.

Take the Shoreway West to East 9th St., turn left (south).

Take E. 9th St. to St. Clair Ave. and turn right (west).

Take St. Clair Ave. to West 9th St. and turn left (south).

Take West 9th St. to Superior and turn right to to over the Detroit-Superior bridge.

When you get across the Detroit Superior Bridge, turn Right on West 25th St. to St. Malachi.

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